Home Cooking, for the sake of your health!

Pan Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Pancetta WalnutsI’ve been hooked on roasting the Brussels Sprouts in the oven.  It is a quick, simple and delicious side dish for any meal.  While flipping through Anne Burrell’s cookbook, this Brussels Sprouts recipe sparked my curiosity. Unlike roasting in the oven these yummy pieces of goodness are prepared stove top.  Brussels Sprouts with bacon?  Don’t mind if I do!  Once again I utilized my ultra flavorful extra virgin olive oil infused with herbs and spices (you can read more about this in my Baked Sea Bass Post).  Chef Burrell calls for infusing the olive oil with garlic and pepper, I was able to skip this step entirely as my oil is already packed with these flavor and then some.

The salty deliciousness of pancetta, the nuttiness of walnuts, and the delicate leaves make this dish truly special.  I believe this dish could make a non-lover of Brussels sprouts a convert.

 
Ingredients
  • extra virgin olive oil (I used my herb and spices infused oil)
  • 1 clove garlic, smashed
  • pinch of crushed red pepper
  • ¼ lb pancetta (or bacon of your choice), cut into ¼ inch dice
  • ½ cup walnuts, coarsely chopped
  • 1 pint Brussels Sprouts, stemmed and leaves pulled apart
  • Kosher Salt to taste
 
Instructions
  1. Coat a large pan with olive oil, add the garlic and red pepper and bring to medium heat (I simply heated my olive oil since it’s already infused with spices including garlic and pepper). When the garlic has turned golden brown (roughly 2-3 minutes), throw it away.
  2. Add the pancetta and walnuts and cook until pancetta is crispy and brown (roughly 5-6 minutes). Add the Brussels sprouts and toss to combine all of the ingredients. Season with salt, cover and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until the sprouts have wilted.
  3. Remove the lid, raise the heat to high and cook for an additional 8-10 minutes. Let the leaves brown. Taste and season with additional salt (if needed).

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Most ingredients in cooking are derived from living organisms. Vegetables, fruits, grains and nuts as well as herbs and spices come from plants, while meat, eggs, and dairy products come from animals. Mushrooms and the yeast used in baking are kinds of fungi. Cooks also use water and minerals such as salt. Cooks can also use wine or spirits.
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