Home Cooking, for the sake of your health!

Crunchy Quinoa GranolaI never knew just how good granola can taste until I finally decided to try making it at home on my own.  Clearly I’ve been missing out on the goodness of picking own ingredients and controlling the sweetness levels.  After a few experimentations I finally came up with my favorite recipe containing just about every seed and nut one can think of.  Quinoa adds a great “health” factor and the crunch that I love.

The beauty is truly in the simplicity of this recipe and the overall method.  Combine all the nuts and seeds, stir in the sweetener and bake for 1 hour.  While baking your kitchen will be filled with the most divine smell!  I cannot say enough good things about just how great this tastes.  I enjoy this treat as a cereal with raw milk and also as an addition to my homemade yogurt.

 
Ingredients
  • 2¼ cups rolled oats
  • 1 cup quinoa, uncooked
  • ¾ cup whole raw almonds
  • ½ cup sunflower seeds
  • ¼ cup hulled hemp seeds
  • ¼ cup shredded unsweetened coconut
  • ¼ cup raw pecans, chopped
  • ¼ cup pine nuts
  • ¼ cup pumpkin seeds
  • ½ cup pure maple syrup
  • ½ cup light agave nectar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • ⅓ cup dried cherries (optional)
 
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 225 degrees F (my oven’s lowest marked temperature is 250 so I eyeball the mark). Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the rolled oats, quinoa, almonds, sunflower seeds, hemp seeds, coconut, pecans, pine nuts, and pumpkin seeds. Mix well. In a smaller bowl combine the maple syrup, light agave nectar and vanilla. Add the liquids into the dry ingredients and stir well to make sure everything is evenly combined.
  3. Spread the mix in an even, thin layer on the baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Sprinkle the cinnamon evenly on top. Bake for one hour.

About this site

Most ingredients in cooking are derived from living organisms. Vegetables, fruits, grains and nuts as well as herbs and spices come from plants, while meat, eggs, and dairy products come from animals. Mushrooms and the yeast used in baking are kinds of fungi. Cooks also use water and minerals such as salt. Cooks can also use wine or spirits.
Naturally occurring ingredients contain various amounts of molecules called proteins, carbohydrates and fats. They also contain water and minerals. Cooking involves a manipulation of the chemical properties of these molecules.

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